The Oregon Biz Report - Business News from Oregon

Read about accutane journal moderate acne here

Oregon income 15% behind Washington

May 9, 2012

Oregonians Need a Raise
By Oregon Prosperity Project

New Data: Oregon incomes 15% less than Washington incomes.

New 2011 data from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis indicates that when it comes to per capita incomes, compared to the rest of the U.S., Washington and Oregon are on diverging tracks.

The per capita income of Washingtonians, at $44,294, is 6% higher than the national average.

Oregon’s per capita income, at $37,909, is 9% lower than the nation as a whole.

The numbers illustrate two states on different tracks.

In 1971, Washington’s per capita income was about 0.5% above the national average with Oregon’s being close, about 3% below that of the U.S. – so the gap between the two states was less than 4%. By 1981 the gap was 9%. By 1991 it was 10.7%. By 2001 it was 11.9%. And in 2011 it has widened to over 15%.

It would not be so disturbing if the gap simply reflected a difference between two states running ahead of the national average, one more successfully than the other. But it is the result of one state going up – and other down – relative to the rest of the nation.

We believe that Oregonians need a raise.

But to earn that raise, one thing is clear:

Oregon must change its approach to become more competitive in attracting and keeping jobs, notably in manufacturing, and avoid the rising specter of increased regulatory and cost barriers.

It requires that we make job creation a priority.

That’s why, over the past few months, we have advocated unapologetically for:

Exempting data centers from new intangibles taxation (upon passage of Prosperity Project-endorsed legislation, Apple announced plans to locate major data center in central Oregon)

Oregon withdrawing its share of water from the Columbia River in order to bolster agriculture and food processing (450,000 acre feet translates into 10,000 new jobs, $1.7 billion in additional income for Oregonians)

Increasing timber harvest on state-owned lands (2,000 new jobs, $440 million in additional income)

The expedited approval of a new Nestle water bottling plant (50 new jobs for the small town of Cascade Locks and a doubling of the town’s tax base)

Eliminating Oregon’s death tax (31,000 new jobs, $1.7 billion in income growth by 2017.)

Fixing a major problem that threatens to undermine Oregon’s workers’ compensation system (Oregon’s stable workers’ compensation system is a major competitive advantage for Oregon business that we can’t afford to lose.)

Each of these issues will make a huge difference for Oregon – helping us close the income gap with Washington and the rest of the country.

Here’s a more detailed look at the new income data for Oregon and Washington:

  
Print This Post Print This Post    Email This Post Email This Post

Discuss this article

Matt L May 10, 2012

Oregon could also use a few Boeings, Microsofts, Starbucks, Amazons, Costcos,Nordstroms, Paccars and even a 55,000 employee militry base (Joint base Lewis-McChord)would help.

Washington simply has a more pro-business approach. What do you notice driving to Puget Sound from here? Road construction and lots of it. What do you see in the suburbs of Seattle? New Schools and expanding parks.

There is no income tax. Property taxes are appropriately high because you get alot in return. Businesses pay a variety of taxes that Oregon does not collect – and they don’t rebate or kick it back either.

Their legislature has made the same mistakes as Oregon’s in spending away any “good-times” surplus, but you can bet they’ll earn it back faster and plug the gap while Oregon still cuts and cuts and cuts.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recent Articles

Press Releases



Top Business News

 

Top Women's News

 

Top Natural Resource News

 

Top Faith News

 

Copyright © 2016, OregonReport. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use - Copyright - Legal Policy | Contact Oregon Report

Stay Tuned...

Stay up to date with the latest political news and commentary from Oregon Business Report through daily email updates:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Prefer another subscription option? Subscribe to our RSS Feed, become a fan on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter.

RSS Twitter Facebook

No Thanks (close this box)